Anyone familiar with Wikipedia will get the idea behind the OCA Wiki: it's a community-edited online "Resource Base"... with scope to develop, in time, into a full Canoeists' Encyclopedia.

A wiki (i/ˈwɪki/ wik-ee) is a website that allows the creation and editing of any number of interlinked web pages via a web browser

We're currently working on a structure for core content - but we'll not let that stop us making a start - so keep checking back for additions and get in touch if you'd like to get involved!

The Important Places...

"Flipping through Dad's old slides it occurred to me that maybe, just maybe, if I can bring back together these two things that were young once - my father and the Colorado river - I can somehow travel back in time to learn something of who my father was...

The narration is superb... but Dad's the real star of this beautiful film....

The Important Places...

"Flipping through Dad's old slides it occurred to me that maybe, just maybe, if I can bring back together these two things that were young once - my father and the Colorado river - I can somehow travel back in time to learn something of who my father was...

The narration is superb... but Dad's the real star of this beautiful film....

Morall River Films - Introduction to Canoe Camping

Two years ago, Mark and Merri Morall of Morall River Films built up expectations of a DVD they had been working on by releasing "More than a River": a lush opening sequence, capturing the spirit of tripping and journeying in song as well as in great footage, and heightening anticipation by ending with Sigurd Olsen's famous line about the way of the canoe being "the way of the wilderness and of a freedom almost forgotten"...

Morall River Films - Introduction to Canoe Camping

Two years ago, Mark and Merri Morall of Morall River Films built up expectations of a DVD they had been working on by releasing "More than a River": a lush opening sequence, capturing the spirit of tripping and journeying in song as well as in great footage, and heightening anticipation by ending with Sigurd Olsen's famous line about the way of the canoe being "the way of the wilderness and of a freedom almost forgotten"...

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  1. Welcome to the Spring/Summer issue of the OCA E-Journal - with reports from France on the Open Canoe Festival - plus trips on the Ardèche and Allier - features from Canoefest 2015 - a photoblog of a Rannoch Moor crossing - and a report on Circumnavigating Ynys Môn (Angesey) - plus a book review and other bits...

  2. Welcome to the Spring/Summer issue of the OCA E-Journal - with reports from France on the Open Canoe Festival - plus trips on the Ardèche and Allier - features from Canoefest 2015 - a photoblog of a Rannoch Moor crossing - and a report on Circumnavigating Ynys Môn (Angesey) - plus a book review and other bits...

  3. Welcome to the Spring/Summer issue of the OCA E-Journal - with reports from France on the Open Canoe Festival - plus trips on the Ardèche and Allier - features from Canoefest 2015 - a photoblog of a Rannoch Moor crossing - and a report on Circumnavigating Ynys Môn (Angesey) - plus a book review and other bits...

  4. Rutland Water is a curious place to boat. By surface area, you're on the largest reservoir in the country, and most of it can be explored (lies outside of the nature reserves). With such a fine extent of water so far inland... you'd be silly to turn down a bit of independently exploration in your open canoe - but can you?

    Rumour has it the powers that be are hugely restrictive - but actually, paddling's no problem... so long as you erect a large flagpole and have something flapping from it...

    This past weekend a group of us were hosted (extremely well) by the sailing club on the south shore: a departure from our habit of basing ourselves on the north shore. Despite persistent drizzle on the Sat am - and a distinct lack of breeze Sat pm - we had a wonderful time... with a fair bit of independent journeying by folk who weren't sure they could... and a fair few folk working on new skills.

    Open Canoe Sailing Group @ Rutland Water - June 2015 from Greg Spencer on Vimeo.

    Of course, that probably documents all sorts of additional infringements - perhaps including some of us not having appropriate squiggles and hieroglyphics on our sails - but we were welcomed with smiles by those we got close enough to talk to... and certainly excited comment from everyone from sea kayakers to folk in small yachts.

    Along the way, SoTP Member "Lime" made excellent use of his Apache Tribe...

    Edward showcased this newly restored heritage boat:

    ...and following a period of waiting around for something interesting to happen:

    John S was prevailed upon to do something about it!

    We departed on a very positive not. I got the impression we could each get away with turning up and canoeing at other times... albeit at a cost, and only on production of evidence of insurance... and on condition of not even CONTEMPLATING the heinous crime of landing anywhere... but fundamentally, we appeared to be most welcome.

    OK - pup disagrees - this is NOT doggie-friendly territory - but if you've not got four legs and a tail you can have a good weekend away!

    Notes: Other photos, Facebook Album

  5. Rutland Water is a curious place to boat. By surface area, you're on the largest reservoir in the country, and most of it can be explored (lies outside of the nature reserves). With such a fine extent of water so far inland... you'd be silly to turn down a bit of independently exploration in your open canoe - but can you?

    Rumour has it the powers that be are hugely restrictive - but actually, paddling's no problem... so long as you erect a large flagpole and have something flapping from it...

    This past weekend a group of us were hosted (extremely well) by the sailing club on the south shore: a departure from our habit of basing ourselves on the north shore. Despite persistent drizzle on the Sat am - and a distinct lack of breeze Sat pm - we had a wonderful time... with a fair bit of independent journeying by folk who weren't sure they could... and a fair few folk working on new skills.

    Open Canoe Sailing Group @ Rutland Water - June 2015 from Greg Spencer on Vimeo.

    Of course, that probably documents all sorts of additional infringements - perhaps including some of us not having appropriate squiggles and hieroglyphics on our sails - but we were welcomed with smiles by those we got close enough to talk to... and certainly excited comment from everyone from sea kayakers to folk in small yachts.

    Along the way, SoTP Member "Lime" made excellent use of his Apache Tribe...

    Edward showcased this newly restored heritage boat:

    ...and following a period of waiting around for something interesting to happen:

    John S was prevailed upon to do something about it!

    We departed on a very positive not. I got the impression we could each get away with turning up and canoeing at other times... albeit at a cost, and only on production of evidence of insurance... and on condition of not even CONTEMPLATING the heinous crime of landing anywhere... but fundamentally, we appeared to be most welcome.

    OK - pup disagrees - this is NOT doggie-friendly territory - but if you've not got four legs and a tail you can have a good weekend away!

    Notes: Other photos, Facebook Album

  6. This trip is just the latest in a series which Lynne Percival has completed with her son, Tobey - a series which started when he was just a toddler... based around this map:

    Inspirational journeying... in the best canoe country in the UK... written up with style and panache... illustrated with stunning photos... and involving youngsters from a very early age. What's better than one such account? Well - two (independent) accounts!

    If you only read one canoe-tale this spring... make sure it's either Lynne's Tale or Mal's Tale :)

  7. This trip is just the latest in a series which Lynne Percival has completed with her son, Tobey - a series which started when he was just a toddler... based around this map:

    Inspirational journeying... in the best canoe country in the UK... written up with style and panache... illustrated with stunning photos... and involving youngsters from a very early age. What's better than one such account? Well - two (independent) accounts!

    If you only read one canoe-tale this spring... make sure it's either Lynne's Tale or Mal's Tale :)

  8. Sometimes a photo captures more than just a moment - seemingly capturing the spirit and achievements of an entire era.  This is one such shot - fittingly taken at Loch Lomond - a spiritual home for British canoeing from the 1870s to the 1920 and a favoured haunt in today's resurgence.

    Even 10-15 years ago, this shot would have been unimaginable.  Such canoeing has moved on in leaps and bounds.  That's in terms of ambition, kit, achievement and popularity.  We're looking here at an entire fleet of awesomely seaworthy craft - a fleet which is probably without equal anywhere in the world.

    As we enter the 25th Anniversary year of the foundation of the Open Canoe Sailing Group... I can't imagine a shot which might better embody all that has been achieved - and I'll share this in tribute to Keith Morris​ and David Stubbs​, without whom scenes like this would still not be conceivable.

    Great work guys - and I'm sorry I was unable to be there!

    Links:

    History: http://www.lochlomondsc.org/club-info/history/

    Today: http://www.ocsg.org.uk/

  9. Sometimes a photo captures more than just a moment - seemingly capturing the spirit and achievements of an entire era.  This is one such shot - fittingly taken at Loch Lomond - a spiritual home for British canoeing from the 1870s to the 1920 and a favoured haunt in today's resurgence.

    Even 10-15 years ago, this shot would have been unimaginable.  Such canoeing has moved on in leaps and bounds.  That's in terms of ambition, kit, achievement and popularity.  We're looking here at an entire fleet of awesomely seaworthy craft - a fleet which is probably without equal anywhere in the world.

    As we enter the 25th Anniversary year of the foundation of the Open Canoe Sailing Group... I can't imagine a shot which might better embody all that has been achieved - and I'll share this in tribute to Keith Morris​ and David Stubbs​, without whom scenes like this would still not be conceivable.

    Great work guys - and I'm sorry I was unable to be there!

    Links:

    History: http://www.lochlomondsc.org/club-info/history/

    Today: http://www.ocsg.org.uk/

  10. Omer Stringer was a very different character to adventurers like George W. Sears (Nessmuk, who inspired through his writings in "Forest and Stream magazine") and to Nathaniel H. Bishop (co-founded of the ACA who wrote "Voyage of the Paper Canoe").

    Where others (up to and including Bill Mason and the Kraikers) set the focus on wilderness tripping, Omer is more associated with celebrating the joy of connecting with the water through paddle and blade - whether as art or as just "goofing around".

    Carrying Places Canoe Works have long held the definitive profile of Omer Stringer

    We now have another major source on him... and one with an impressive collection of classic film archive stuff: The history of Beaver Canoe, from Algonquin to Target.

  11. Martin Strunge's excellent review of the 2014 Open Canoe Festival.

  12. Martin Strunge's excellent review of the 2014 Open Canoe Festival.

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